Blog: Everything about Skin

How to Make Your Hands Look Younger

Hands reveal much about a person. There are gardening hands, rock-climbing hands, rowing hands, poets’ hands, nervous hands and couch-potato hands. Regardless of the type, all hands age and not necessarily well. Our hands are one of the first places to show signs of aging and are among the hardest to camouflage.

 

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How to get rid of agespots

Find out what the experts are saying about how to reduce wrinkles and remove age spots.  Looking for the fountain of youth? With all the new formulas and findings today, it's hard to know what really works. Well, you can relax. We've researched what the experts say about reducing wrinkles and removing age spots and tested the old myths for you. Check out our top 10 findings below.

 

 

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When to use retinol cream

Retinol, retinoic acid and retinyl palmitate are all forms of vitamin A.  Retinoids is the term used to cover its various forms and strengths.  Retinoic acid is the active form of retinol, and actual retinoic acid creams are only available from a doctor or dermatologist. It’s prescribed for serious skin conditions like acne but is also used as a potent treatment for skin ageing. ‘Retinoic acid isn’t allowed in over-the-counter beauty creams because, basically, it works too well,’ explains Dr Mervyn Patterson, cosmetic dermatologist at Woodfood Medical. ‘Once a product has been clinically tested and proven to be that effective, it’s classed as a pharmaceutical, not a beauty product.’ All the different forms of retinol convert into the active form (retinoic acid) when you put them on your skin,’ explains Dr Patterson. ‘However, products you buy over the counter only convert to a small amount of retinoic acid. They’re not the same as putting prescription retinoic acid cream on your face.’

 

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DIY Fruit Scrub

There are a few types of chemical peels and scrubs. They are applied to your skin, most often on the face, and then over then next few days the skin will start to pull away or “peel.” It is most often used on scarred skin, such as acne scars or burns. Over time, the new skin has less and less of the scarred material and new skin is allowed to come to the surface.

 

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Vampire Facelift

With popular interest in vampires seeming to survive beyond a natural lifespan, it was probably inevitable that someone would find a way to capitalize on the term in plastic surgery. But the "vampire facelift" isn't really a facelift, and the only connection to vampires is the fact that it involves use of a product made from your own blood. Yet for a seemingly clever but innocent marketing term it has generated a lot of controversy.

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